Go Back   Family Tree DNA Forums > Universal Lineage Testing (Autosomal DNA) > myOrigins Basics

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11  
Old 10th November 2017, 10:28 AM
Kohlehydrat Kohlehydrat is offline
FTDNA Customer
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 5
very interesting, thank you all for your input and information!
the bit about scots migrating to poland is also quite fascinating.
in my case there are only 3 close relatives left to test, 2 estranged on the one side and my father who is resisting.


edited to add: i hadn't realized how long and widespread scottish migration has actually been.
http://www.genealogical.com/products...1850/9815.html
http://www.scottishdiasporatapestry.org/germany
https://flemish.wp.st-andrews.ac.uk/...d-before-1700/

Last edited by Kohlehydrat; 10th November 2017 at 10:41 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 12th November 2017, 06:53 PM
mollyblum mollyblum is offline
FTDNA Customer
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: The Cosmos
Posts: 307
Blog Entries: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoberlyDrake View Post
Basically, these tests can't differentiate western European populations because the peoples of western Europe have been moving around and mixing for thousands of years. They are a little better at differentiating Southern Europeans from Western Europeans. There was less mixing because of the mountain barrier.

The tests are good at differentiating populations who lived on different continents.

FTDNA says my mother is 8% Western European when in reality, she's over 75%. They give her 56% British Isles, when she's less than 25%. The rest they say is Eastern Europe and she doesn't have any Eastern European at all. On this latest version of the test, they seem to have decided that everyone who was western European should be changed to eastern.


My mother & Uncle also received BI % & they are 50 % Jewish w/Balkan & Abruzzi, Spanish/Turkish & German Ancestry. I think the BI = German
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 17th November 2017, 10:04 PM
PDHOTLEN PDHOTLEN is offline
FTDNA Customer
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Bellingham, WA; since attending WWU.
Posts: 2,132
Smile

FTDNA gives me 40% British Isles, and 29% Scandinavian. My dad was 3/4 Norwegian. So I would think my Scandi would be higher. But there is that recombination with Meiosis that does things with a mind of its own, ha ha.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 18th November 2017, 12:28 AM
wombat wombat is offline
FTDNA Customer
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Posts: 257
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kohlehydrat View Post
very interesting, thank you all for your input and information!
the bit about scots migrating to poland is also quite fascinating.
in my case there are only 3 close relatives left to test, 2 estranged on the one side and my father who is resisting.


edited to add: i hadn't realized how long and widespread scottish migration has actually been.
http://www.genealogical.com/products...1850/9815.html
http://www.scottishdiasporatapestry.org/germany
https://flemish.wp.st-andrews.ac.uk/...d-before-1700/

Yeah, we were shocked to find the Barclay surname eventually turn up way back on one branch of my mom's Baltic German lines and then we saw that some other side branches somewhat more recently had a marriage with someone from Scotland. So just two cases right there all tied to just the going on of a single family in the Baltics. The former case we can't manage to trace back or connect anywhere yet, all we know is she was born around 1770, not even sure in what country so unfortunately we are not sure exactly what Barclay family they tie back to (or how to really even try to manage to figure it out). In the latter case we were surprised to get a hit to some trees from people in the U.S. and Scotland and have it traced back some from that (I bet they were even more shocked since most of their trees were 100% Scottish and were traced all over the place, some even guessed that the guy she married was Scottish, apparently they had a second marriage also back in Scotland as well as the one in Riga and some of them noticed that one, none seem to have had the remotest clue the guy was actually Baltic German and that they went back to Latvia and had kids there, heck FamilySearch hint suggestion was that he was Scottish and that they never had any kids! None of them had a clue she actually went off to Latvia.)


Then we read that apparently tens of thousands of Scottish went to Poland and the Baltics between 1600 and 1900.

Last edited by wombat; 18th November 2017 at 12:33 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 18th November 2017, 12:36 AM
wombat wombat is offline
FTDNA Customer
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Posts: 257
Also do keep in mind that MyOrigins 2.0 also seems a bit unstable. Also that Germany sort of splits into four main types, UK-type Germans, Scandinavian-type, Eastern Europeanish-type and more French-type. It's one of the trickiest regions to specifically pick out, so much mixing, practically every war went through there, so many migrations, etc.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Supposed to be 1/4 British but no British Isles in my results EWischmann myOrigins Basics 2 30th March 2017 01:44 AM
100% British Isles Matt62 myOrigins Basics 24 15th March 2017 10:05 PM
Do I have some British ancestry? Dora DNA and Genealogy for Beginners 4 21st April 2016 05:24 AM
Finish line in sight DWFlineage Adoptees Forum 24 1st May 2015 10:06 AM
This DNA sight will disapear soon lesrles DNA Success Stories 2 7th June 2010 09:27 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:26 PM.


Family Tree DNA - World Headquarters

1445 North Loop West, Suite 820
Houston, Texas 77008, USA

Phone: (713) 868-1438 | Fax: (832) 201-7147
Copyright 2001-2010 Genealogy by Genetics, Ltd.
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.