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Y-DNA Haplogroups & SNPs Advanced Users can talk about SNP based tests such as single SNP testing by Sanger sequencing, Geno 2.0 chip based testing, and next-generation sequencing tests like BIG Y.

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Old 26th September 2017, 10:58 PM
DWFlineage DWFlineage is offline
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snp question

I have (3) snps that were discovered in Big Y testing, in which my 9th cousin also has. These (3) snps are in sequence with one another, their positions are 8675561, 8675562, 8675563. I am wondering if this is an example of a "Haplotype Block", snps that are close enough to one another to be inherited together ultimately indicating degrees of common ancestry. These (3) snps have been given "BY" names, but that is not important to know, as their adjacent positions seem more significant. I looked at all of my other "BY" named snps and none of them are in sequence like these three.

Best regards, Doug
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Old 27th September 2017, 08:05 AM
DWFlineage DWFlineage is offline
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Answering my own question

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Originally Posted by DWFlineage View Post
I have (3) snps that were discovered in Big Y testing, in which my 9th cousin also has. These (3) snps are in sequence with one another, their positions are 8675561, 8675562, 8675563. I am wondering if this is an example of a "Haplotype Block", snps that are close enough to one another to be inherited together ultimately indicating degrees of common ancestry. These (3) snps have been given "BY" names, but that is not important to know, as their adjacent positions seem more significant. I looked at all of my other "BY" named snps and none of them are in sequence like these three.

Best regards, Doug
I asked a project person and this is what this is:

"This is what is known as an MNP, or multi-nucleotide polymorphism. In this case, it should really be styled as a single mutation, 8675561 (TTA->AAT). All Y-chromosome mutations are inherited father to son, indicating common ancestry.

MNPs aren't very well researched in terms of their frequency. We don't know very much about how often they occur, what their stability is, or even whether they can occur piece-wise in successive generations. We do know that they are relatively rare."
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