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Old 12th July 2017, 02:33 PM
Randy583 Randy583 is offline
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Join Date: May 2017
Posts: 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by Randy583 View Post
To: whoiis,

Two thumbs up for the math and science comment. Kudos to you!

I simulated the DNA problem mathematically with a computer program I wrote that mimics a person's genes:

A simple analogy to a person's DNA, or genes, can be represented by a deck of 52 playing cards.

Suppose mom represents a deck of 52 red cards, dad1 represents a deck of 52 blue cards and dad2 represents a deck of 52 green cards.

Child1 of mom and dad1 is created by shuffling mom's deck, shuffling dad1's deck and dealing out 26 cards from each, then combining the delt cards into a deck of 52 cards containing 26 of mom's red cards and 26 of dad1's blue cards.

Child2 of mom and dad2 is created by shuffling mom's deck of 52 cards again, shuffling dad2's deck of 52 cards and dealing out 26 cards from each, then combining the delt cards into a deck of 52 cards containing 26 of mom's red cards and 26 of dad2's green cards.

Child1 and child2 will each have 26 of their mom's red cards, but they will not be the SAME 26 red cards!

On average only about half of each child's red cards, that came from their common mom, will match between the siblings. So these two siblings will only share about 25% of their mom's genes and none of their different father's genes (they are half-blood siblings).

Two full-blood siblings will share 50% of their two parents genes, 25% of their mom's genes AND 25% of their dad's genes.

Determining the proper percentage of DNA that should be common to related individuals can be a source of much confusion.

Using this concept I created instances of individual DNA_Persons and mated them as necessary then matched the common ancestral genes of descendants...

It was somewhat difficult to state the problem correctly at first but not too hard to implement after that.

Randy
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